Showing posts with label Game Based Learning. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Game Based Learning. Show all posts

Tuesday, 7 July 2015

Game-Based Learning Engages Learners and Achieves Learning Objectives

Training and Learning in the workplace is being taken seriously more than ever now. L&D managers are always on the look-out to find ways and means to excite and engage learners into a training activity. In an instructor-led classroom there are many ways of engagement. But with the widespread adoption of technology-enabled learning, there is a strong need to find ways of engaged e-learning as well.
Game-based learning is now heralded as the new way of engaged learning – even for adults. It is a good way to engage the learners and achieve learning objectives set out by the organization as well.

  • A popular misconception is that games are only effective for a young audience. Games have traditionally been created keeping the younger audiences in mind – who are more aligned to newer technologies and are open to explore more. L&D managers who procure e-learning services are often not sure if game-based learning will fit into their audience profiles – that include mid-level or high level executives.  There is now proof that game-based learning can be designed for older audiences also. If a game has enough challenges, learners of any age can enjoy and learn from it.
  • Another misconception is that game-based learning cannot provide serious learning. Many learning games are built for serious learning as well. There are simulations that teach high-end medical procedures or flying skills to air pilots. For corporate training, quizzes on varied subjects can be built – where the learner can be challenged on different issues. In addition to sparking interest and creating a sense of competition, they hone the skills of assimilation and recall. Serious games can also be built with a small learning nugget that provides information or knowledge prior to the beginning of the game. This helps the learner get better prepared for the game as well as utilize the learning nugget to acquire knowledge – utilizing both mediums equally.
  • Also, game-based learning is not always a costly proposition.
    Though building a game takes some amount of logical thought and time, games can be built within tight budgets as well. Simple inter-activities can be built with development tools like Flash, to engage the learner. Many free tools are also available on the internet that can help create simple games of learning like word-building, cross words and so on. Utilizing these, e-learning services companies can create games for corporate learning. A series of simple games can be created over time to provide sustained learning.
There are many benefits of game-based learning and once you get past the mind-block, organizations can utilize them to the fullest. Games can engage even the most reluctant learners. They can breathe in life into the most boring and mundane learning topics. Learners who are withdrawn in an actual classroom might open up in a competitive scenario like a game. Games provide instant learning benefit – as the learner engages with the game and learns from the experience. Assimilation is fast and knowledge gained can be utilized immediately.